Our Charlie’s producing a book on the philosophy of punk – The Truth of Revolution, Brother. It’s just gone live on Kickstarter, so check it out!

Via the ever-wonderful Jón Gnarr in Reykjavik. #liveandletlove indeed

Another new site goes live—this, for our friends Robert Glenn, for whom we’ve just also done an identity. Bling it on!

Another new site goes live—this, for our friends Robert Glenn, for whom we’ve just also done an identity. Bling it on!

Following from yesterday’s post—some pics from the Chapman exhibition. Go. It’s way better than these pics.

We reveal the secret of a successful family-friendly exhibition

We were talking to a leading (and very family-friendly) museum the other day, like you do, about their 2014 blockbuster exhibition. At one point we mused on how we’d bring the kids (9 & 12) to the show, a suggestion met with no small surprise.

The exhibition subject – while undoubtedly populist – does have aspects of the unsavoury, and there would we were told, be a “different offering” for children. They wouldn’t be banned exactly — but we got the distinct feeling that they wouldn’t be welcomed with open arms.

Continue reading…

The lovely Diana Henry’s website launches today, and as you might expect, it’s packed-full of culinary inspiration. Check it out, especially the Journal – especially if you love lemons.

The lovely Diana Henry’s website launches today, and as you might expect, it’s packed-full of culinary inspiration. Check it out, especially the Journal – especially if you love lemons.

We caught the tail-end of the Hayward’s The Great Refusal the other week.

It’s a strange space, the upstairs gallery – feels a little like the place for curators to nod to inclusivity for the undesirables. Punks and protestors; DIY and counter-culturalists – existing at the periphery of the higher-art catered for in the rest of the Southbank’s Rest Is Noise fest.

Not that we’re complaining, like. Any opportunity to see this kind of stuff is always welcome. It’s just that the compact nature of the setting always leaves you wanting more.

There’s an accompanying journal from exhibition organisers the Archive of Modern Conflict with a selection of the images. Buy it here.

Another day, another RIP. :(

Martin Sharp, R.I.P

Martin Sharp, R.I.P

Nice spot for our View From The Shard campaign in The Guardian at the weekend :)

Nice spot for our View From The Shard campaign in The Guardian at the weekend :)

An action shot from our View From The Shard Christmas campaign shoot.

An action shot from our View From The Shard Christmas campaign shoot.

Our Christmas campaign for The View From The Shard breaks today, so here’s a sneak peek of the hero image.
And in case you’re wondering, yes, we did wrap The Shard. All 306 metres of it. No CGI. Eat your heart out Christo!

Our Christmas campaign for The View From The Shard breaks today, so here’s a sneak peek of the hero image.

And in case you’re wondering, yes, we did wrap The Shard. All 306 metres of it. No CGI. Eat your heart out Christo!

We headed to the last day of Virgin Records’ 40 Years of Disruption exhibition yesterday, at Victoria House in Holborn. And a weird mixed bag it was.

The staging was splendidly DIY, all bulldog clips, temporary wooden structures and post-industrial (or post-something anyway) space.

But as refreshing as it was to see a pragmatic approach to the build of the exhibition, we couldn’t help but feel that a similarly efficient approach had been taken to the curation.

It started off perfectly. Video projections, early history and archive, and an extended riff on the Pistols – and then just as the Virgin story arguably gets really important (ie beyond the tabloid headlines and into the diverse post-punk roster) the archive petered out a bit.

Call us miserable old traditionalists, but we’d wanted to see actual stuff from the time, not just large format run-outs. A copy of Muriel Spark’s Public Image was a nice touch, and the Spice Girls’ merch tie-ins (in all their looking-really-dated-now datedness) were ace – but where was the real Frontline archive, or the Soul II Soul stuff? And the two Boy George outfits looked like the kind of clobber he’d take down to the charity shop to make room for the proper stuff.

But perhaps we pick too much –  after all, there was a hell of a span to cover (and it was quite nice to see the Stones relegated to an easy-to-miss corner).

From Neneh Cherry to Polystyrene, OMD to the Chemical Brothers, it’s hard to overstate the importance of the part played by Virgin. Or not be saddened by how generic the current industry feels these days.

Them 80s especially were great weren’t they? With the evil Tories in the blue corner – and the blacks, the youth, the gays, the punks et al in the other. Tribes were important then.

Fuck knows how our kids’ll cope now that everything’s branded and sponsored and leveraged and tweeted.

The exhibition ended pretty much where it began, with a recreation of the original Virgin store, packed with Never Mind The Bollocks lps – a quaintly Frieze-like art installation, and perfect punctuation. For all its flaws (and perhaps those were really more to do with our desire for more more more), it was a cracking thing to behold.

We’re still not sure about Richard though. His teeth are far too white.

We’re kicking the week off in proper Wag style, with some rather fine bling going under the expert eye of the ever-wonderful Rolant Dafis. 

We’re kicking the week off in proper Wag style, with some rather fine bling going under the expert eye of the ever-wonderful Rolant Dafis